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How to object to a candidate on a party list

South Africans have a four-day window to object to a candidate on the lists of the 48 political party contesting the 8 May elections. The party lists will be made public on Friday 29 March at www.elections.org.za. An objection against a candidate must be made by Tuesday 2 April.

The Constitution states that every voter is eligible to be a Member of Parliament except:

-unrehabilitated insolvents

-declared to be of unsound mind by a court

-sentenced to more than 12 months imprisonment without a fine option, but only after an appeal, and this disqualification ends five years after the sentence is completed.

To object to a candidate, see breakdown of steps and details of biggest political parties:

objection

The Commission will notify the objector and the party of its decision about the objection.

In 2014, there were 45 objections and one was upheld by the IEC.

18 & 19 year old registered voters doubled to 34%!

In less than two months South Africans are heading to the polls. The voters' roll has closed and just over 26.7 million people are registered to vote in the upcoming elections - an improvement of 2% since the registration drives, but down almost 5% compared to 2014.

vap

A worrying statistic we reported on before the 2019 registration drive, was the fact that 'a mere 16% of South Africans between the ages of 18 and 19 and only 54% of the country’s population between the ages of 20 and 29' were registered to vote at the time.

Did the IEC's Xse(Ek sê) campaign, specifically designed with a 'youthful feel' to get more young people to register to vote make a difference? Let's look at the numbers:

vote

Although the 18-19 year old age group more than doubled its registered voters prior to elections, registration has dropped dramatically for 2019 Elections compared to 2014 Elections and 2009 Elections. It looks like youth voter education is needed going forward. Registration numbers in that age group dropped dramatically for 2019 and it looks like there is some work to do going forward.

vote

Just about 800 000 people have registered since the start of the final registration weekend at the end of January 2019 until the voters' roll closed on 26 February 2019. According to the IEC, that last registration weekend saw 703 794 new registered voters – of which 574 899 (over 80%) were under the age of 30. In addition, the IEC also undertook registration drives for tertiary students from 4-7 February in an aim to get young people to register.

vote

Please check your voter registration status online, SMS your ID number to 32810, or check on the IEC's mobile app for your voting station before 8 May!

The Week Ahead: It’s a week of farewells and loose ends…

It's the last rites for the Fifth Parliament. After a dizzying and tumultuous five years, the National Assembly will rise this week and the NCOP a week later. But a fair amount of work will be done before MPs depart. Many will immediately go out on the campaign trail (at least those seeking re-election) while others will be contemplating their next chapter: retirement, a new career and life as an ordinary member of the public.

In the remaining days, the NA chamber is scheduled to sit for long hours to vote on several outstanding Bills, consider assorted statutory instruments, recommend important statutory appointments and finalise leftover Committee reports. Beyond this, there will be opportunity for some electioneering and battles when lawmakers discuss the following topic: Growing and transforming South Africa together from an Apartheid state to a thriving democracy.

The NA will conclude its business with the traditional end-of-term speeches, where MPs reflect on their time in office and express well wishes to their colleagues. 21 March is Human Rights Day and is a significant day in this country’s history. Both chambers will commemorate the day with a debate under the theme: Accelerated socio-economic transformation – the key to human rights and better future for all. Over in the NCOP chamber, legislative business and Committee reports make up the other agenda items.

The Committee corridor is the site for several important meetings. Here is a rundown of the highlights:

The Steinhoff debacle is one of the biggest corporate scandals the country has ever seen. Since it was uncovered, Parliament has met regularly with the involved parties to get a full account of the transgressions, establish the role of regulators and gaps in legislation and get an update on the investigations to ensure that implicated people are held to account. The follow-up meeting will be closely watched to see what progress has been made. (Tuesday)

The Portfolio Committee on Police will get a briefing from SAPS on its operational readiness and preparations ahead of the 2019 general elections. SAPS is expected to confirm that, as part of the National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure, which is coordinating all security and law enforcement operations throughout the country, it has plans in place to create a safe and secure environment for the elections. (Tuesday)

In the past few weeks, legislators have received briefings on the political developments in several hotspot countries. The spotlight will be on Venezuela this week. The presentation will highlight South Africa’s contribution to a peaceful resolution of the challenges in that country. (Wednesday)

The Finance Committee has for several years been focusing on the urgent need to tackle the Illicit Economy and Illicit Financial Flows far more decisively and has regularly expressed its concern at SARS’ inadequacies in this regard. The Committee welcomed the re-establishment of an enforcement unit, to be possibly named the Illicit Economy Unit, and urged SARS to ensure that it is suitably resourced with officials with the necessary skills. The Committee made a commitment to actively monitor progress in this regard. In line with this, it has arranged a joint follow-up meeting to discuss illicit financial flows. (Wednesday) In between, MPs will be doing some heavy legislative lifting as they consider the following Bills: National Minimum Wage Amendment Bill; Property Practitioners Bill; National Land Transport Amendment Bill; Electronic Deeds Registration Systems Bill; Carbon Tax Bill; Customs and Excise Amendment Bill; Public Investment Corporation Amendment Bill; Financial Matters Amendment Bill; iKamva Digital Skills Institute Bill; Repeal of the Overvaal Resorts Limited Bill; Division of Revenue Bill; National Gambling Amendment Bill; Copyright Amendment Bill; Performers’ Protection Amendment Bill and Foreign Service Bill. The NCOP will continue to exist until immediately before the first sittings of the provincial legislatures while the NA, despite being dissolved, will continue to function until the day before 8 May elections.

View the full schedule here.

*This summary is based on the schedule as it is published on Monday morning. The programme is subject to frequent updating so the link above needs to be checked daily to confirm the programme for the day.

Mr Moloko Maila (ANC)

maila

What is your political background? How did you come to join your political party and become an MP? My politics began in 1980 at Kgarahara High School in Ga Polatla, Botlokwa, Ga-Machaka, Limpopo when we received a visit from someone who spoke about the idea of establishing a branch of the Congress of South African Students (COSAS) - I was elected a treasurer of that branch. Although COSAS centred on students issues when we converged at the then University of the North, because Limpopo was still Lebowakgomo Homeland, the plight of the black population was raised quite sharply.

In 1981 was expelled from Kgarahara for being too vocal on student issues. I went onto study at Makgoka High School in Boyne and later at university I joined the Azanian Student Convention (Azasco) as an ordinary member of that structure and had joined and became part of the leadership core in Moletji area of the South Africa Youth Congress (SAYCO).

As a practicing teacher from 1988 I had then joined the Northern Transvaal Teachers Organisation (NOTTO) which later became part of SADTU. When the ANC was unbanned the congress found a ready core-group of political inclined individuals that had been involved in civic organisations, development forums. We established the first branch of the ANC in Moletji before the ANC constitution said branches had to be village based. When we then established branches I was then elected branch chairperson of the Kanana branch leadership at Moletji at the time. I remained in the branch chairperson position until 2000 when Kanana amalgamated with four other villages to form the Solomon Mahlangu branch. In 2002/3-2006 I was elected sub-regional secretary of Aganang sub-region. During this time I had been elected to be a member of the district executive committee of the SACP in the Castro Pilusa District until 2010/11. At the South African National Civic Organisation (SANCO) I had been elected a branch secretary for Kanana.

In 2005 I was moved to the Premier’s office as a coordinator of district community development workers when Mr Sello Moloto was Premier of Limpopo. In 2008 whilst serving in the Premier’s office I was elected into the Peter Mokaba Regional Executive Committee (REC) until 2018.

I came to Parliament in 2014 where I was deployed to the Portfolio Committees on Justice, International Relations as well as the Ad Hoc Committee on Constitutional Review.

What does your job as an MP entail? On Mondays I can be found at my constituency office. On Tuesday mornings I attend the justice committee, but on Wednesday mornings I have to prioritise according to the agenda how I split my time between the two committees. On Thursday mornings I attend the ANC caucus. Tuesdays afternoons are for plenary and the study group of international relations for the ANC. The justice study group is on Wednesday afternoons. If the constitutional review committee does not sit on Fridays I return to my constituency.

What obstacles prevent Parliament from doing its work and how would you fix it? The system currently is quite accommodating and you adjust and learn as you go along. The only snag I have identified is the oversight model of the PC on International Relations as the Department has a footprint all over the world with the current oversight model not accommodating for physical oversight and regularly rather making us to rely on media publications instead, which is very problematic.

Which constituency office have you been assigned to? Can you give examples of constituency work you engaged in? My constituency is Blouberg Municipality in the Capricorn region of Limpopo. As the community is mostly rural, general issue I deal with relate to water supply and home affairs related matters.

Does Parliament do a good job of holding the Executive to account? If not, what can be done to improve this? I am mostly satisfied about the Executive’s response to our invitations and they do account but of course sometimes one gets Ministers that submit apologies consistently which doesn’t always make us happy because we don’t get a chance to engage said Ministers directly.

Are you happy with the proportional representation system or are you in favour of electoral reform? I have an issue with the formula which is used at that level to apportion the vote between a ward councillor and a proportional representative (PR) councillor. The winner takes all principle does not seem to apply consistently when accounting for the overall political party representation in that there are people and parties that get what they do not deserve especially when you count ballots.

Is Parliament’s public participation model adequate/ robust enough that it affords enough public participation before a law is passed? During the constitutional review exercise, when we sought input from communities on amending section 25, I felt we had gone an extra mile as Parliament. I have realised that communities are triggered by issues and how we make laws, because when you call for public comment on a technical bill not the same enthusiasm will be shown by our people and therefore I feel the public participation model to date is adequate.

What are you passionate about? This applies both in a political/professional arena as well as personally? Self development and empowerment has always been a passion, such that had I been given the opportunity I would ensure that co-operatives and other social enterprises would thrive. Moreover I would want grant beneficiaries to be assisted to create their own sustainable income generation such that SASSA could have lesser beneficiaries. I know that would probably mean investing more on skills teaching, upgrading and incentivising people to self-sustain but I would certainly prefer that.

What is your message to South Africa? South Africans have to be cognisant of the power of their vote and I therefore urge them to register and cast their votes. Political freedom was not achieved without toil and bloodshed; we currently house a sizeable number of fellow Africans who have left their home countries because of political instability and strife and we certainly do not want South Africa to ever reach such stages of lawlessness and anarchy. Casting a ballot ensures that our democracy thrives as our power lies in electoral franchise.

What is your political background? How did you come to join your political party and become an MP? My politics began in 1980 at Kgarahara High School in Ga Polatla, Botlokwa, Ga-Machaka, Limpopo when we received a visit from someone who spoke about the idea of establishing a branch of the Congress of South African Students (COSAS) - I was elected a treasurer of that branch. Although COSAS centred on students issues when we converged at the then University of the North, because Limpopo was still Lebowakgomo Homeland, the plight of the black population was raised quite sharply.

In 1981 was expelled from Kgarahara for being too vocal on student issues. I went onto study at Makgoka High School in Boyne and later at university I joined the Azanian Student Convention (Azasco) as an ordinary member of that structure and had joined and became part of the leadership core in Moletji area of the South Africa Youth Congress (SAYCO).

As a practicing teacher from 1988 I had then joined the Northern Transvaal Teachers Organisation (NOTTO) which later became part of SADTU. When the ANC was unbanned the congress found a ready core-group of political inclined individuals that had been involved in civic organisations, development forums. We established the first branch of the ANC in Moletji before the ANC constitution said branches had to be village based. When we then established branches I was then elected branch chairperson of the Kanana branch leadership at Moletji at the time. I remained in the branch chairperson position until 2000 when Kanana amalgamated with four other villages to form the Solomon Mahlangu branch. In 2002/3-2006 I was elected sub-regional secretary of Aganang sub-region. During this time I had been elected to be a member of the district executive committee of the SACP in the Castro Pilusa District until 2010/11. At the South African National Civic Organisation (SANCO) I had been elected a branch secretary for Kanana.

In 2005 I was moved to the Premier’s office as a coordinator of district community development workers when Mr Sello Moloto was Premier of Limpopo. In 2008 whilst serving in the Premier’s office I was elected into the Peter Mokaba Regional Executive Committee (REC) until 2018.

I came to Parliament in 2014 where I was deployed to the Portfolio Committees on Justice, International Relations as well as the Ad Hoc Committee on Constitutional Review.

What does your job as an MP entail? On Mondays I can be found at my constituency office. On Tuesday mornings I attend the justice committee, but on Wednesday mornings I have to prioritise according to the agenda how I split my time between the two committees. On Thursday mornings I attend the ANC caucus. Tuesdays afternoons are for plenary and the study group of international relations for the ANC. The justice study group is on Wednesday afternoons. If the constitutional review committee does not sit on Fridays I return to my constituency.

What obstacles prevent Parliament from doing its work and how would you fix it? The system currently is quite accommodating and you adjust and learn as you go along. The only snag I have identified is the oversight model of the PC on International Relations as the Department has a footprint all over the world with the current oversight model not accommodating for physical oversight and regularly rather making us to rely on media publications instead, which is very problematic.

Which constituency office have you been assigned to? Can you give examples of constituency work you engaged in? My constituency is Blouberg Municipality in the Capricorn region of Limpopo. As the community is mostly rural, general issue I deal with relate to water supply and home affairs related matters.

Does Parliament do a good job of holding the Executive to account? If not, what can be done to improve this? I am mostly satisfied about the Executive’s response to our invitations and they do account but of course sometimes one gets Ministers that submit apologies consistently which doesn’t always make us happy because we don’t get a chance to engage said Ministers directly.

Are you happy with the proportional representation system or are you in favour of electoral reform? I have an issue with the formula which is used at that level to apportion the vote between a ward councillor and a proportional representative (PR) councillor. The winner takes all principle does not seem to apply consistently when accounting for the overall political party representation in that there are people and parties that get what they do not deserve especially when you count ballots.

Is Parliament’s public participation model adequate/ robust enough that it affords enough public participation before a law is passed? During the constitutional review exercise, when we sought input from communities on amending section 25, I felt we had gone an extra mile as Parliament. I have realised that communities are triggered by issues and how we make laws, because when you call for public comment on a technical bill not the same enthusiasm will be shown by our people and therefore I feel the public participation model to date is adequate.

What are you passionate about? This applies both in a political/professional arena as well as personally? Self development and empowerment has always been a passion, such that had I been given the opportunity I would ensure that co-operatives and other social enterprises would thrive. Moreover I would want grant beneficiaries to be assisted to create their own sustainable income generation such that SASSA could have lesser beneficiaries. I know that would probably mean investing more on skills teaching, upgrading and incentivising people to self-sustain but I would certainly prefer that.

What is your message to South Africa? South Africans have to be cognisant of the power of their vote and I therefore urge them to register and cast their votes. Political freedom was not achieved without toil and bloodshed; we currently house a sizeable number of fellow Africans who have left their home countries because of political instability and strife and we certainly do not want South Africa to ever reach such stages of lawlessness and anarchy. Casting a ballot ensures that our democracy thrives as our power lies in electoral franchise.

To learn more about this Member, visit his profile.

More MP blogs.

The Week Ahead: Parliament is winding down...

It's the National Assembly’s penultimate week.

As a result, there is a bit of frenzy as legislation and important business that can be completed are rushed to the finishing line while other less urgent parliamentary business is dropped for lack of time.

In the remaining days, lawmakers are scheduled to vote on several Bills, consider statutory instruments and appointments, finalise assorted Committee Reports and say their farewells.

The legislation covers a wide range of issues from cybersecurity, to age of criminal capacity, to qualifications, to online publications, to carbon tax to Money Bills and gambling just to name a few.

Beyond this, legislators will probe the Deputy President and selected Ministers in the Economic Cluster during their scheduled oral reply question sessions this week.

The practice of oral questions is an established part of the parliamentary day and gives MPs an opportunity to question the Executive about matters for which they are responsible. For all its limitations, this is usually an occasion of heightened interest and the most interesting exchanges happen during the follow-up questions from opposition MPs. Everything from specific scandals and programmes to big-picture policy and performance will be under the microscope. Generally, governing party MPs and the opposition have different objectives when it comes to these engagements: the former tends to provide Ministers with an opportunity to put government policies and actions in a favourable light while the latter aims to do the opposite. No doubt a few MPs will use the opportunity for point-scoring and try to eke out some parliamentary publicity ahead of the elections.

The Leader of Government Business will respond to these questions

Meanwhile, the Ministers will respond to the following questions

Also dotting the agenda are regular items like Members’ Statements, Motions Without Notice and Notices of Motion.

Elsewhere, the NCOP has not scheduled any sittings this week. The Committee corridor is the site for several important meetings. Here is a rundown of the highlights:

The Ad Hoc Committee established to identify candidates to fill vacancies at the Commission for Gender Equality has set aside the entire week to interview, deliberate and select candidates for appointment. (Tuesday – Friday)

The Minister of Home Affairs will appear before the oversight Committee for the fourth consecutive week. This time, he will meet to discuss the Visa Facilitation Service contract and progress made on the implementation of the e-Visa system. In addition, the Committee will deliberate on the Gupta family naturalisation draft report (Tuesday)

The Portfolio Committee on Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries will get progress reports on several outstanding matters: the Food and Nutrition Security Policy, establishment of the Food Control Agency and challenges facing the poultry industry. (Tuesday)

The police’s recruitment strategy and training model for new recruits will be in the spotlight when SAPS briefs MPs. POPCRU and SAPU will give their input on the topic. (Tuesday)

Last year, the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs resolved that the Department of Environmental Affairs should as a matter of urgency initiate a policy and legislative review of Captive Breeding of Lions for hunting and Lion bone trade with a view to putting an end to this practice. The Committee further recommended that the Minister should submit quarterly reports to the Portfolio Committee on the progress of this policy and legislative review. The Department will give an update on the implementation of this resolution. Also on the agenda are follow-up briefings on the rhino demand management and Waste Bureau Management. (Tuesday)

Last week, MPs interviewed 24 candidates to fill vacancies on the SABC Board. They will now move on to discuss the merits of the candidates, indicate their preferred candidates and recommend names to the NA. The public broadcaster will always be a hot button issue, so we can expect some contestation around some of the names. The Communications committee will also hear from the SABC on the progress made on the turnaround strategy; labour relations issues; and implementation of the recommendations of the Ad Hoc Committee on the SABC Board Inquiry. (Tuesday)

SAPS will give feedback on the vetting and lifestyle audits of senior management. (Wednesday)

The Department of Public Enterprises will brief MPs on the contribution of state-owned companies in terms of jobs created, promotion and support of women and youth owned businesses. (Wednesday)

In between, there will be detailed legislating as MPs consider the following Bills: Division of Revenue Bill; Carbon Tax Bill; Customs and Excise Amendment Bill; Public Investment Corporation Amendment Bill; Airports Company Amendment Bill; Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company Amendment Bill; Regulation of Gatherings Amendment Bill; Public Audit Excess Bill; National Public Health Institute of South Africa Bill; iKamva Digital Skills Institute Bill National Gambling Amendment Bill and Foreign Service Bill.

View the full schedule here.

*This summary is based on the schedule as it is published on Monday morning. The programme is subject to frequent updating so the link above needs to be checked daily to confirm the programme for the day.

Video: Youth Monitoring Parliament

Since 1995, the Parliamentary Monitoring Group is enabling thousands of young people to go into Parliament and write detailed reports of the proceedings of the 50 oversight committees.

Here are some comments from our monitors, interns and past alumni – even two MPs are former PMG monitors.

The Week Ahead: President’s final appearance in the NA

It's a rapid descent towards the end of the Fifth Parliament as MPs rush to finalise all urgent business.

The endgame of the current Parliament is fast approaching and loose ends are gradually being knitted together. There are only a few weeks left (three weeks for the NA and four for the NCOP) before lawmakers say their farewell.

Question Time and Legislation are the main chamber business this week.

Question Time is one of the ways Parliament scrutinises the work of government and holds it accountable. Many of the questions touch on bread and butter issues and/or high-temperature business and the responses are generally newsworthy. An interesting part of the exercise is how the questions are structured as MPs simultaneously try to get their talking points across and ask a question.

The President will have his final engagement with NA lawmakers on Thursday. In terms of the rules, these oral question sessions happen once per term, are three hours long and are limited to six main and supplementary questions.

President Ramaphosa will be probed on a variety of issues. Read the questions here

Selected Ministers in the Governance Cluster will be probed on Wednesday. Read what MPs will be asking them here

The other point of interest will come from the proposed resolution by EFF leader, Mr Malema, to rename Cape Town International Airport to Winnie Madikizela-Mandela International Airport.

Beyond this, there will be a fair amount of legislative lifting with MPs set to pass four Bills. The programme is also dotted with the usual items such as the consideration of Committee Reports, approving appointments, Members’ Statements, Motions Without Notice and Notices of Motion.

Elsewhere, the NCOP chamber has only scheduled one sitting to consider several Bills. Delegates will spend most of the week in Committee and attending provincial budget speeches in their respective provinces.

There is plenty of noteworthy action in the Committee corridor. Here is a rundown of the highlights:

It’s been a long running saga between the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs and the SA Weather Services since the Committee resolved in 2017 to hold the Board members personally liable for R2 million in fruitless and wasteful expenditure. The Committee also called for the removal of the entire Board for failure to exercise its fiduciary duties. The Committee is expected to get legal advice on the matter and reach a conclusion. (Tuesday)

The Portfolio Committee on Communications has shortlisted 24 candidates who will be interviewed to fill eight vacancies that exist on the SABC Board. The Committee will conduct interviews from 5 - 7 March 2019. (Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday)

The Finance Committees will meet to consider and adopt the Fiscal Framework and Revenue Proposals (Budget) Report. The Report is expected to acknowledge that the budget was tabled under difficult economic conditions of low growth; revenue shortfall; rising debt levels and that difficult choices have to be made. (Tuesday)

The Minister of Home Affairs will appear before the oversight Committee for the third consecutive week. This time, he will meet to discuss implementation of the Home Affairs National Identification System, contingency plans to render services at Lindela Repatriation Centre after the voluntary liquidation of Global African Operations formerly known as Bosasa; the Visa Facilitation Service contract and the progress made on the implementation of the E-Visa system. (Tuesday)

The Portfolio Committee on Police will receive a briefing from the Minister of Police on the appointment of the current CFO of IPID as the Acting Executive Director of the body for the next three months. (Wednesday)

Two weeks ago, the SAHRC briefed Parliament on its Report on the Underlying Socio-economic Challenges of Mining-affected Communities in South Africa. The report found that mining companies did not provide detailed and sufficient information to enable communities and local government to clearly understand how land could be used post-closure. SAHRC found DMR was not performing the role of monitoring mining companies in the provision of housing in mining affected areas in consultation with local government which was its responsibility. The Department will respond to the Report’s findings and recommendations. (Wednesday)

MPs will get a briefing from National Treasury on the Integrated Financial Management System. (Wednesday)

The Jobs Fund; social grants; localisation and Extended Public Works Programme are other topics that will be in spotlight and will generate some interest.

In between, the legislative agenda will consume a big part of the programme, with the following Bills under consideration: Financial Matters Amendment Bill; Science and Technology Laws Amendment Bill; Copyright Amendment Bill; Performers’ Protection Amendment Bill; National Qualifications Framework Amendment Bill; iKamva Digital Skills Institute Bill; Carbon Tax Bill; Customs and Excise Amendment Bill; Public Investment Corporation Amendment Bill; Defence Amendment Bill; 2019 Division of Revenue Bill and 2019 Public Audit Excess Fee Bill.

View the full schedule here.

*This summary is based on the schedule as it is published on Monday morning. The programme is subject to frequent updating so the link above needs to be checked daily to confirm the programme for the day.

Provincial Budgets: 2019

SA's national budget was tabled in Parliament on 20 February 2019 - what follows this process is the tabling of provincial budgets in each of the nine provincial legislatures. Provincial budgets are as important as the national one - the budget sets out how the provinces intend spending public funds on important service delivery and governance areas such as healthcare, infrastructure and education. Take a look at the infographic below outlining the dates the provincial budgets will be delivered and some other interesting information relating to the provincial budgets:

budget

Ms Dineo Raphuti (ANC)

raphuti

What is your political background? How did you come to join your political party and become an MP? I was influenced at home since during apartheid our family home was regularly visited and raided by the security branch at Meadowlands in Soweto - due mainly to my grandmother and uncle’s political activities. My uncle went into exile and from 1982 when I was already working; I would visit him trying to get him to be aligned to the struggle of the ANC more than that of the PAC as the Pan Africanists were more radical in how they wanted to achieve freedom. Having gone to Albert Moroka High School in Thaba Nchu, in the Free State, most of the teaching staff at the school that time was Afrikaans and we were vigilantly watched for any dissenting political voices as students. My father was a fierce opponent of the homeland system and that also piqued my interest in politics in general. All those influences, including the matter of black consciousness which Steve Biko was a great proponent of, made me quite fierce as a student specifically curtailing of our rights by the apartheid regime.

As a registered school I went to work at Johannesburg Hospital post nursing school where I joined the National Education Health and Allied Workers' Union (NEHAWU) right after it was established in the late 80s. At the time public transport was still segregated, including hospital staff. I was the first to forcefully stage a sit in protesting the hospital’s whites only transport. We also managed to get black staff accommodated within the hospital precinct.

After unbanning I joined the Diepkloof ANC branch as a Branch Executive Committee (BEC) member. At my branch I remained active working with youth forums and encouraging political participation by the youth in the countries politics. When the Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA) was formed I joined them as they were pushing for professional recognition of nursing as a job. In 2002 I was appointed DENOSA Gauteng regional secretary until 2011; as well as to the provincial Executive Committee (PEC) in COSATU. In 2009 I was elected into the Gauteng PEC of the ANC until 2018.

In 2011 I became the Chief of Staff of Deputy Minister of Health, Dr Gwen Ramokgopa until 2014 when I was deployed to Parliament. I was deployed to the Home Affairs and International Relations Portfolio Committees of which I am a still a member.

What does your job as an MP entail? I am at constituency which is mostly informal settlements on Mondays. Tuesday mornings I attend Home Affairs so that Wednesdays I attend the International Relations committee. On Thursday morning is the ANC caucus so that from Tuesday to Thursday afternoon we are at plenary. Alternatively, on some of these days I attend the Women’s Multiparty Caucus as well as study groups after plenary sessions.

What obstacles prevent Parliament from doing its work and how would you fix it? I am quite acclimatized to Parliament as I already had been attending Fourth Parliament with Dr Ramokgopa as Chief of Staff of her office. The only difference between 4th and 5th Parliament is that the Chamber when I came in was quite rowdy and disorderly although sense has prevailed lately.

Which constituency office have you been assigned to? Can you give examples of constituency work you engaged in? My constituency is at Tshwane including Centurion which includes Olievenhoutbosch, Mooiplaas and Itireleng. We mostly are engaged with unemployment challenges, human settlements and skilling of young people that is routing them towards learnerships and apprenticeships.

Does Parliament do a good job of holding the Executive to account? If not, what can be done to improve this? I am satisfied with how we do our work as committees although sometimes it comes across that chairpersons of committees do work as individuals when accounting for our collective products in terms of the bills we produce and public statements on issues. There has to be fair delegation of powers within committees amongst the members of individual committees. I would prefer more television coverage of the committee work which culminates in debates on bills at the Chamber.

Are you happy with the proportional representation system or are you in favour of electoral reform? The system in its entirety can be quite unfair if you take the matter of the coalition local governments led by the DA as the party has won no outright majority. Proportional representation formula has to be revisited.

Is Parliament’s public participation model adequate/ robust enough that it affords enough public participation before a law is passed? The model is quite lacking because the airtime the Chamber gets should rather be reprioritised for actual imbizos and public comments that are derived from communities for mandates to be derived from said communities directly.

What are you passionate about? This applies both in a political/professional arena as well as personally? I would have been a youth motivator, activist, advocate and getting youth involved in the political economy of the country.

What is your message to South Africa? South Africans and youth in particular need to register and vote for the ANC so that it can continue building a better future going forward.

To lean more about this Member, visit her profile.

More MP blogs.

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